iGIPF — An iOS Game in 2 Weeks

Alexey GrunichevApr 18, 2012

Conclusion.

The two weeks are over and so is our story. You can see the final result in screenshots below.

After looking at result of our work, we can say one thing. There is nothing scary about writing an iOS game. Yep, iOS requires coders to change some programming approaches. Sometimes you can’t understand why the heck it should be done a particular way, but that’s ok.

The most difficult part of the whole process was our lack of experience in working with certain libraries (APIs). For example, we twice changed our version of cocos2d. The first time we selected a stable version, but it had a couple of issues connected with texture coordinates positioning. So, we switched to a beta version. The second change was our error in that we encountered a memory leak with sprites and thought, after a small investigation, that it could have been due to using the beta version of cocos2d. Thus, we updated the version again. However, the memory leak did not go away and we later found an error in our code.

Another problem is working with scenes directly in code. When you have one resolution supported it’s probably ok, but with 4 resolutions it’s already a nightmare. Now, CocosBuilder beta release went to open source and we definitely will consider it in our next projects.

The next consideration for developers is graphics and sounds. Don’t be afraid to outsource everything you can’t do as soon as possible. It’s very frustrating when you have to wait because you hesitated to outsource something and thus can’t speed up a process. So, just do it in the beginning of a project when you’re still pretty comfortable with your own deadlines. By the way, don’t be afraid of tough deadlines. Frankly, it motivates.

What’s next?

We completed everything we had planned for the first version. Of course, it’s not ideal and we have many ideas about what can be improved. Should there be interest in the game, we will integrate those improvements. The final version has 120 files and 10870 lines of code (with empty lines and comments). The application has been submitted for review and approved!


You can check out iGIPF on the AppStore, and if you have any questions, we’re glad to answer them.


 

uDevGames 2011

Convergence — Best Gameplay
Kung Fu Killforce — Best Overall Game, Best Audio, Best Presentation
Flying Sweeden — Best Graphics, Most Original
Time Goat — Best Story