Could somebody answer a few questions for me?

Nibbie
Posts: 2
Joined: 2012.10
Post: #1
Hi there.

My name is Adrian Manser, I am a student at the school gleeson college, currently in year 11. A subject for year 11 is the research project, where we are to come up with and answer a guiding question in an outcome and folio. My guiding question is; what makes a successful iphone game?
So, if somebody could please answer a few questions for me, it would be just great. Thanks.

What do you think successful games have in common?

How important do you think graphics are in iPhone games? Why?

How would you go about marketing your games, and do you believe marketing plays a big part in what makes a iPhone game successful?

How did you go about choosing the music in your games? Do you believe music and sound played a big part in how successful a game is?

Now, everything in this interview will be used in my research project, and I will be annotating this interview. If you could answer these questions as soon as possible, it would be great.

-Adrian
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Member
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Joined: 2004.07
Post: #2
(Oct 7, 2012 09:17 PM)orseoste7o Wrote:  What do you think successful games have in common?

Authenticity and sincerity. Does the author really give a crap about the game they are making, or are they just making another freemium endless runner because someone made a lot of money with a freemium endless runner in the last 6 months?

When the author doesn't truly stand behind their game, it shows. And people pick up on that, whether they know it or not.

(Oct 7, 2012 09:17 PM)orseoste7o Wrote:  How important do you think graphics are in iPhone games? Why?

Of course they're important, but you need to detach from the notion that you need to have a certain style. Find a style that fits your game, that you (or an artist you work with) can make, and again, is authentic and sincere.

Don't do ANNNNYYTHINGGGGG just because other games do it successfully. You're dooming yourself and your game to being just a follower. This goes for 3D graphics, blocky retro pixel art, or The Indie iOS Style™ which is basically a lot of Cyan-Magenta-Yellow-Grey with super thin fonts and diagonal lines out the ass. Assume NOTHING about your style, but deliberately decide what you will need.

(Oct 7, 2012 09:17 PM)orseoste7o Wrote:  How would you go about marketing your games, and do you believe marketing plays a big part in what makes a iPhone game successful?

Marketing singlehandedly determines whether or not your game will be successful. You can have the best game in the world but it won't matter if no one knows about it.

You need to determine the style of game you truly enjoy making, then find a niche that matches that style. For instance, I am pretty good at super fast action games, so genres like bullet hell shooters would be a better fit for me. (Alternatively, you could also find a niche and then determine how well you could fill that niche.) Then make sure those people know about your game. Get to know them, get involved. Don't just carpet-bomb 50 forums with some lame-ass intro post with an app link.

(Oct 7, 2012 09:17 PM)orseoste7o Wrote:  How did you go about choosing the music in your games? Do you believe music and sound played a big part in how successful a game is?

Music and sound are absolutely crucial to a really awesome game experience.

I've tried several strategies when it comes to music.

For Kill Dr. Coté and (some of) Laserface Jones, I wrote the music myself. This has the advantage of being more artistically coherent with the rest of the game and is by far the most rewarding option. But it takes time, and I'm not as good at it as a professional musician. Yet, anyway.

For some tracks on Laserface Jones, I licensed a few royalty-free tracks from the internet. The advantage is you can get a professional song instantly, and it's not THAT expensive. The downside is it's not rewarding at all, and most likely the songs will not fit with the style of the game. Also, you run the very real risk of finding another game using the same music, which is really, really lame.

For Kung Fu Killforce 2.0, I am working with an independent contractor, who charges me per minute of music created. The disadvantage being it's the most expensive option, and it does take time, but I can be working on the game while the musician creates the song. You also have to be able to clearly communicate what kind of music you want, or you could wind up with a lot of useless back-and-forth. The advantage, however, is a really awesome professional track made specifically for your game, and it's still super rewarding to hear when it's finished.

Justin Ficarrotta
http://www.justinfic.com
"It is better to be The Man than to work for The Man." - Alexander Seropian
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Nibbie
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Joined: 2012.10
Post: #3
Thanks for the detailed reply, that was really helpful! That was the perfect answer, exactly what i was hoping for Smile
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Apprentice
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Post: #4
I think if passion in creating the game is evident that the game will have no issues at least building a cult following. There are bound to be people who enjoy the same passions you do
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Nibbie
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Joined: 2014.09
Post: #5
I made a game specifically because it filled a need and had a unique concept. In my case I was not going for the most intense experience or the most realistic graphics. Instead I concentrated on presenting the core principle. I wrote a game called EvolveABot that uses actual evolution to create working robot control software. The player has to figure out how to defeat robots with his own robots, using evolved software principles. It's a merger of organic and digital. You can have a look at it if you wish. http://www.evolveabot.com I would appreciate an opinion on that myself.
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Nibbie
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(Oct 7, 2012 09:17 PM)orseoste7o Wrote:  What do you think successful games have in common?

There are a lot of successful games in the market currently. Every game out there has its own charm or the success points. I would say any successful game needs to bind the user , and bring that "Aww" "FuckYou" moments. Once you have that from a user you are sure(or not) that your game is providing that fun factor.
And a damn nice multiplayer will send your game sky rocketing to success.

(Oct 7, 2012 09:17 PM)orseoste7o Wrote:  How important do you think graphics are in iPhone games? Why?
They are the first piece of presentation that your game offers even before the player has played the game. Trust me in today's scenario if you cant catch the eye of the user, they wont even try you super fun game. As JustinFic is saying follow your gut for it, there is a very thin line between inspiration & copying.


(Oct 7, 2012 09:17 PM)orseoste7o Wrote:  How would you go about marketing your games, and do you believe marketing plays a big part in what makes a iPhone game successful?
Woah Marketing is the necessary evil. Thousands of games eat the dust despite being super awesome. If only if you are very lucky and your game wins game awards, then bro the publicity alone can lift your game, but then again visiting these events is somewhat marketing again.

(Oct 7, 2012 09:17 PM)orseoste7o Wrote:  How did you go about choosing the music in your games? Do you believe music and sound played a big part in how successful a game is?
I am kind of half hearted in answering this. Being a designer my point of view should be that music plays a big role in reinforcing the aesthetics/fun into your game.
But iphone games are most of the times played with music off. So its a gamble if your want to try with your game.
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Moderator
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Post: #7
LOL, being the gravedigger that I am, I totally missed how old this thread was. I guess I needed some iDG posting action!

(Oct 7, 2012 09:17 PM)orseoste7o Wrote:  What do you think successful games have in common?
Creativity, usually hard work, good marketing, and most importantly luck. Luck is hard to come by in an over-saturated market such as iOS games. I've seen some really good games by devoted developers get few sales over the years. I've seen some really crappy games get viral sales. The gamers are fickle and seemingly random about what they'll pay for.

(Oct 7, 2012 09:17 PM)orseoste7o Wrote:  How important do you think graphics are in iPhone games? Why?
Very important! Why? Because I can't recall any successful games with poor graphics. That doesn't mean there weren't/aren't any successful ones with poor graphics out there, but good visuals are key to people remembering things, and I can't remember a crappy looking successful one right now.

(Oct 7, 2012 09:17 PM)orseoste7o Wrote:  How would you go about marketing your games, and do you believe marketing plays a big part in what makes a iPhone game successful?
I've always relied on someone else for iOS marketing, so I can't really say what they do. However, yes, I believe marketing is key to sales. If you can't advertise somehow, then you won't make sales because no one will know about your product. It's that simple. I strongly believe that a good marketeer is worth a significant portion of your game sales, if you don't do the marketing yourself.

(Oct 7, 2012 09:17 PM)orseoste7o Wrote:  How did you go about choosing the music in your games? Do you believe music and sound played a big part in how successful a game is?
Yes, music and sound are highly important. I remember reading a review of one of my games where they mentioned the music as being particularly good. That is proof in the pudding right there that the music matters to gamers. As far as choosing? I get a "vision" for the product and try to pick music that fits that vision. It's a very artistic part of the process for me. Fortunately the music is also one of the easiest and enjoyable parts of the game development process.
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