Where to start?

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Post: #16
Quote:Sell blood/plasma/other fluids for a month or two. Smile

I agree. Good quality stuff is worth bleeding for if you can't pay for it up front! Smile

No seriously, the reality of the situation, especially on the Mac, is that you sometimes have to ... gulp ... pay for things if you want them.

If you want to get into something that takes up a serious amount of your time, like 3D game programming, it's gonna cost you a little investment to get to do it unless you really think you're smart enough to figure it all out on your own without other investments like books. From my own personal experience (many years of plinking around with this stuff), again, I can safely say that either Unity (Mac path) or XNA (Windows path) are two of the best choices one could make for jumping into 3D game development. A lesser path might be Torque (well established commercially) or iGame3D (indie Mac) or Dim3 (indie Mac), or something else I've overlooked. The hardest path (but achievable) is doing it yourself, which is what I've done but do not recommend for or against, except to say it is MUCH HARDER TO DO THAN YOU THINK.
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Post: #17
I hadn't played with any processing demos in a while and went fooling around over there and found Video Pong

It turns on your camera, and you move your arms to move the pong paddles on both sides of the video screen! In your browser!

I'm blown away...by pong!

More Processing demos
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Apprentice
Posts: 16
Joined: 2008.01
Post: #18
Yeah, well I'm a newbie here. But I'm currently developing a 3D OpenGL game in futureBASIC. BASIC is the best option for anyone new to programming cf C or C++ etc. And FutureBASIC has just been released as freeware at http://www.stazsoftware.com. There's a 3D openGL demo in the pack which compiles into Universal binary.
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Post: #19
AnotherJake Wrote:Yeah, that does seem a bit odd doesn't it? But consider this: I think of myself as 100% Mac and have no intention of ever selling a software product on any other platform, but I dual boot into XP just to fiddle around with XNA from time to time. It's *that* good! I don't use Windows for anything else at all. It is incredibly cool to make a little game and upload it to my living room Xbox 360 to play on the 40" HDTV in all its glory. If I were a Windows user wanting to start 3D game programming, I wouldn't consider any other alternative. If I were a Mac user wanting to start seriously getting into 3D game development, I would still consider it. In fact, if it were I who was starting off and didn't necessarily have an attachment to Mac and loved 3D games so much that I wanted to seriously get into them, I would most definitely drop the Mac and go Windows-only just for XNA. I can't believe I just said that, but dude, it's that cool! Not recommending against Mac, but just being honest about 3D game programming. Unity certainly fits the bill on the Mac IMHO, but for the price, if you have an Intel Mac, you could afford Windows and XNA too!

I thought you liked Obj-C better?
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Post: #20
AnotherJake Wrote:If you want to get into something that takes up a serious amount of your time, like 3D game programming, it's gonna cost you a little investment to get to do it unless you really think you're smart enough to figure it all out on your own without other investments like books.

Seconding this. I started with the C++, OpenGL and SDL route, which as far as code goes is a pretty easy and powerful combination. BUT, when I look back, I've probably spent over $1000 just in books. Not to mention several years worth of building a code base.

It's a weird feeling to then grab the 30 day trial of Unity and be able to do everything I've done so far in C++ and OpenGL, times ten, after taking about 5-10 hours to work through their tutorials.

You factor all that in, and suddenly, Unity is actually the most affordable option.

Justin Ficarrotta
http://www.justinfic.com
"It is better to be The Man than to work for The Man." - Alexander Seropian
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Post: #21
Hairball183 Wrote:I thought you liked Obj-C better?

I do! ... but honestly, C# is almost as good IMHO, and I would be more than happy to use it full time if the need was there. The only minor tick against it is that it runs through a virtual machine -- a fast VM, but a VM all the same.

But the language isn't really my point. Like JustinFic said, in the end, what you get with the right tools makes all the work and investment in other stuff look kind of silly in comparison. When I started out in this hobby there wasn't any Unity or XNA. If there were, I would most certainly have taken one of those routes. XNA is free if you have Windows (although admittedly, you do still have to do a substantial amount of work to use it). Unity's price is easily worth it when you consider the raw thousands of hours of study and work it takes just to get started on your own -- not to mention the cost of the books. Sure you can do the easy stuff right off the bat without much more than a few weeks of effort, but you will quickly discover that things can become somewhat complicated past a spinning cube. On your own you gotta figure out how to do texture loading, model loading, scene organization, culling, integrating physics, sounds, sprite drawing, particle generation, billboards, skyboxes, terrain, collision detection, picking and selection, basic windowing and input, and maybe even skeletal animation depending on what you want to do, and the list goes on and on and on... Thousands of hours... OR you can bite the bullet and actually pay for Unity and get all that and then some for a day's worth of reading tutorials. Your choice. I'm still doing it the hard way from scratch, but I don't recommend it is all I'm saying.
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Post: #22
Oh. Well, I know what software I'm buying nextGrin Although I will continue to learn Cocoa and Objective C…
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Post: #23
Hairball183 Wrote:Oh. Well, I know what software I'm buying nextGrin Although I will continue to learn Cocoa and Objective C…

That's a wise choice. Wink

I should also note that continuing to learn Cocoa and Objective-C is especially worthwhile for things other than games. And you're starting off at the right age too!
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